Why is kabaddi called a rough game?

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Kabaddi is a sport in which two teams of twelve players compete against each other. However, each team is limited to seven players on the field at any given moment. The 13m x 10m Kabaddi playing surface is divided into two halves by a white line, with one team occupying each side.

Kabaddi is a rough game to play since it involves a lot of pushing and pulling, screaming and shouting, and tumbling to the ground.

The Goal of the Game 

The overall goal of the game is to score more points in the allocated time than the opposing team. To achieve so, each club must try to score points both offensively and defensively. When attacking, the offensive team sends a raider into the opponents’ half who must contact one or more opponents in order to score a point. When defending, the goal is to wrestle the raider to the ground or just prevent them from returning to their own half before their breath runs out.

Players and their gear 

Kabaddi is a sport in which two teams of twelve players compete against each other. However, each team is limited to seven players on the field at any given moment. The 13m x 10m Kabaddi playing surface is divided into two halves by a white line, with one team occupying each side. It can be played on a variety of surfaces, from a dedicated clay court to spare ground with a chalked-out playing surface. 

Unlike many other popular sports and games, Kabaddi requires no specific equipment, clothes, or accessories, making it a game that is accessible to everyone.

Injuries in Kabaddi

In the last seven years, Kabaddi has exploded in popularity all over the world. It’s a team sport that necessitates a great deal of agility, strength, and speed. As a highly physical sport, it necessitates the participants’ maximum fitness and stamina. As a result, there are a lot of injuries. 

The typical injuries include

  1. Knee injuries (ACL & meniscus injuries)
  2. Shoulder injuries (dislocation & rotator cuff injury)
  3. Hamstring muscles or groin muscles pull/strain
  4. Ankle sprains

When it comes to injury prevention, it’s practically difficult to save an athlete from injury in a contact sport like Kabaddi, however injury risk can be reduced. Pre-habilitation, targeted strength, and conditioning programmes can help to lessen the likelihood of the above injuries. 

What is the difference between rehab and prehab? 

When you become hurt, you go to your physiotherapist and try to heal from it using electrotherapeutic techniques or exercise treatment. This is referred to as “Rehab.”

Prehabilitation, on the other hand, aims to reduce the likelihood of damage. It’s based on the premise that increasing strength, flexibility, and motor control in the regions most sensitive to injury might help you avoid being hurt, spend less time on the sidelines, and avoid recovery suffering. It has the potential to reduce injuries in tackling and contact sports. 

Prehab focuses on specific issues that put you at risk for injury, such as weak hamstrings, poor ankle mobility or stability, or poor stabilising muscle control. Prehab allows you to focus on smaller muscles and more detailed motions.

What role does pre-habilitation play in kabaddi? 

As a sports physical therapist, I’ve seen some severe injuries that have forced an athlete to retire from sports. Collisions and tackles are prevalent in kabaddi, as are injuries. Some injuries, such as ankle twisting, shoulder dislocations, contact and non-contact ACL and meniscus injuries of the knee, muscle pull or tear, are avoided. 

Prehabilitation will protect you from injuries and help you become a better version of yourself. When there are fewer injuries, the performances improve even more.